Conferences

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Exploring Contemporary Pedagogies for Teaching and Learning … in a technology-rich world

From cea at: Exploring Contemporary Pedagogies for Teaching and Learning … in a technology-rich world

Exploring Contemporary Pedagogies for Teaching and Learning … in a technology-rich world

How well are we responding to both the needs of our modern learners, and the unprecedented possibilities technology is now presenting them with? Is it time for us to be much bolder and more ambitious in our expectations of what our modern learners might be capable of? If so, what could and should school look like, or is it time for us to more radically rethink the nature and purpose of schooling?

In this one-day workshop, world-renowned pedagogical consultant Bruce Dixon will challenge many of the assumptions we have made about the way in which we use technology in our schools; it will explore our ideas of integration vs. disruption, and it will seek to build a case for more ambitious and bolder thinking about the steps we might take in the future.

This event will appeal to forward-thinking Superintendents, Directors of Education, Deans of Faculties of Education, as well as Directors of Learning & Educational Technology, Curriculum Developers, and Instructional Designers.  The day will progress through the following three sections:

Part 1:  Are you ready for this? Re-scoping vision in a technology-rich world

Part 2:  Understanding the Modern Learner: the realities of their world, and the implications for teaching and learning.

Part 3: Turning vision into reality: challenges and opportunities in leading the change to a technology-rich learning environment.

Each section will include critical conversations, time for reflection, and case study group work to explore some of the key ideas and questions that must be addressed for leaders looking to better understand the role of technology within their schools.

To register with a credit card, please follow this link:
To register by fax, please follow this link:
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Home

Crowd and cloud: towards a collaborative future, 5 – 7 September 2012

The Designs on e-Learning (DeL) conference leads and fosters innovative practices in teaching and learning with technology in art, design and communication.

As digital technologies continue to evolve and transform the pedagogic landscape, we face exciting and innovative possibilities for the future of education. New forms of mobile learning and cloud computing are shaping the learning environment, enabling students to learn in multiple physical, social and conceptual spaces.

The 2012 designs on e-learning conference will explore the impact of these shifts on our teaching practice, and question how we can maximise their potential for improving student learning. This is an opportunity to join the crowd to collectively generate ideas, tackle problems, and share best practices in e-learning. The format of the conference will be innovative, with barcamps, streamed sessions, discussions, performances and creative work.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Collaboration and Community Building
  • Digital Literacy
  • Social Media
  • Sustainability
  • Studio and Technology
  • User Generated Content

Keynote speakers:

Contacts:

Robin Shaw: r.shaw@arts.ac.uk (Conference organiser)
Charlotte Webb: c.webb@arts.ac.uk (Web communications officer, CLTAD)
Mehreen Talpur: m.talpur@arts.ac.uk (PA, CLTAD)

Conference Fees:

Early bird rate – £195.00 (until 1st July)
Full rate – £215.00 (after 1st July)
Student rate (excluding dinner) – £100.00

  • speakers


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Otis College of Art and Design

Re/Locating Learning: Public Practices as Art

February 23–25, 2012
College Art Association 100th Annual Conference, 2012 (CAA 100)
Los Angeles Convention Center West Lobby, Level 1
1201 South Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90015www.otis.edu
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Organized by: Suzanne Lacy, Chair, and Sara Daleiden, Faculty Member, Otis Graduate Public Practice
with guest faculty members Pablo Helguera, Artist, and Sally Tallant, Chief Executive Artistic Director, Liverpool BiennialOther participants:
Otis Graduate Public Practice faculty members S.A. Bachman, Andrea Bowers, Sandra de la Loza, Dana Duff, Bill Kelley, Jr., Karen Moss, and Renee Petropoulos; graduate students, and CAA visiting artists, critics and cultural practitioners”The…feminist classroom.. is and should be a place where there is a sense of struggle, where there is visible acknowledgement of the union of theory and practice, where we work together as teachers and students to overcome the estrangement and alienation that have become so much the norm in the contemporary university.”
— bell hooks, “Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black”

Radical pedagogy and educational critique are key concepts in current debates on artistic public practices. Pedagogical models are explored, re-imagined, and deployed by art practitioners in highly diverse projects comprising laboratories, discursive platforms, temporary schools, participatory workshops, and libraries. Artists are revaluing the collective knowledge and agency of communities through process-based works that mix the aesthetic with the social and political. In the west lobby atrium of the L.A. Convention Center, Otis Graduate Public Practice (MFA) students occupy a prototypical classroom where changing and spontaneous groupings of students and faculty “perform” discussions on politics, relational and public practices, and the experience of learning exchanges. A changing series of presentations and discussions will be open to casual and immersive participation over three days.

Thursday, February 23, 12–5pm
Friday, February 24, 9am–6:30pm
Saturday, February 25, 1:30–5:00pm
Free and open to the public

This intensive performance and graduate level course, for which students receive college credit, is part of Otis’ Concentric Conversation Series which prompts discourse among cultural practitioners based in Los Angeles. Otis has the only educational program in the Southern California region dedicated exclusively to providing artists with advanced skills for working in the public sphere, focusing both on collaborative and individual art production.
Applications currently being accepted for Fall 2012.
For more information about the Graduate Public Practice Program, contact Program Coordinator Consuelo Velasco Montoya at 310-846-2610 or cvelasco@otis.edu.
For more information about CAA 1010, visit conference.collegeart.org/2012/

Otis offers graduate degrees in Fine ArtsGraphic DesignPublic Practice, and Writing.
Get one-on-one instruction from world-renowned faculty who are important players in the global art and design communities. While each of these graduate programs is distinct, the Los Angeles network includes the most sought-after visiting artists, designers and writers, as well as constant dialogues with museums, galleries, and cultural institutions.

To request a viewbook, please visit:www.otis.edu/admissions/graduate_admissions/graduate_information.html
For information on Otis Graduate programs visit: www.otis.edu
With questions e-mail: admissions@otis.edu

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September 15, 2011 Art and<br /><br /><br />
Education
sep15_ecuad.jpg
Emily Carr University of Art and Design /
European League of Institutes of the Arts

W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century

Emily Carr University of Art and Design
December 7–9, 2011
1399 Johnston Street
Vancouver, BC V6H 3R9
Registration is now open!
Early Bird Deadline: September 30, 2011 (extended)For more information and registration visit www.elialeadershipsymposium.com
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The European League of Institutes of the Arts and Emily Carr University are pleased to present the 5th ELIA Leadership Symposium: ‘W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century. The event will bring together leaders from higher arts education institutions and universities across the globe for an important and timely discussion on the changing role of art education today. After London, Zurich, Los Angeles and Hong Kong we are excited to host this important event in Vancouver.
W/Here will serve as a studio experience for leaders in the fields of higher arts education who are interested in understanding how to meet the challenges of the changing context of learning. W/Here is committed to creating a generative environment of conversation, building towards outcomes that will have tangible effects for today’s higher arts education institutions and universities. Through a combination of presentations and facilitated discussions, W/Here will provide an opportunity for administrators and educators and to share strategies and models for addressing the role of the 21st Century art and design university.Three key themes will inform the content of the sessions:Have We Ever Been Modern: The Transformation of the Learning Space
Imagining the new arts school requires a challenge to the idea that Higher Arts Education knows itself and its own future. Demographic change, technology, ecology and an evolving urban space have undermined a model of an arts school once considered radical and modern nearly a century ago. What is required now are a series of informed provocations to stimulate a debate about the creation of a new type of art school building for a future in which the role of leadership in Higher Arts Education is being transformed.Dispersed Learning: Knowledge and Expertise in Arts and Design
Art schools are no longer the authoritarian keepers and distributors of knowledge. Their expertise is being challenged by social networks and increased mobility, both fostering informal and dispersed learning and exchange. Canons are crumbling. A new set of demands is placed on the art school to re-imagine and re-define its role. What expertise and knowledge should be developed to support the necessary shifts in leadership? These sessions will propose answers to new demands for leaders who see the role of their institution being contested.Open Source: Leading Through Access
New generations of leaders in education and the arts are emerging from the creative and technological changes that have surfaced in the past decade. How will this cadre of leaders be different from those who came before them? These sessions will focus on building deeper and more diverse leadership through access to the educational and developmental preparation of new leaders—those who come perhaps from different sociology-economic, educational or cultural backgrounds.


ELIA

Beulingstraat 8
1017 BA Amsterdam
The Netherlands
Contact: info@elia-artschools.org 

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Mobile Learning 2011

Mobile Learning 2011

@MobileLearn2011 London
Focussing on the outlook for Mobile Learning in Education (FE and HE), this feed supports an event at the College of North West London, on September 28th 2011

The event is FREE to attend, but participants must register in advance with mobile.learning@cnwl.ac.uk by 14th September 2011

Mobile learning: Now and the Future

28th September 2011

Presented by

The West London Lifelong Learning Network &CNWL 12:30-4:00 at College of North West London, Dudden Hill Lane, London, NW10 2XD

Overview:

This symposium will focus on Mobile Learning in Further and Higher Education. Presenters will survey current practice, and look to the future, as providers come to terms with teaching and learning in the digital age, and with ubiquitous use of handheld devices in a connected world. Many Universities and Colleges are already exploring these capabilities, and looking to move forward with Mobile Learning. This event will facilitate networking opportunities, and enable practitioners, researchers, managers and policy-makers to explore and reflect on current and future practice.

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mobile.learning@cnwl.ac.uk

MobileLearn2011

More information:

 

CALL FOR PAPERS
Aesthetics in the 21st Century                  [download as pdf]

University of Basel
September 13-15, 2012

Confirmed Speakers
Graham Harman, Iain Hamilton Grant, N. Katherine Hayles

Ever since the turn of the century aesthetics has steadily gained momentum as a central field of study across the disciplines. No longer sidelined, aesthetics has grown in confidence as evidenced by recent works by major contemporary thinkers such as Jean-Luc Nancy (Muses II), Jacques Rancière (DissensusAesthetics and Its Discontents) and Alain Badiou (Handbook of Inaesthetics). In this vein, aesthetics does not merely designate a discipline concerned with theories of art, but more fundamentally the primacy of sensation and sensual encounter itself.

Even though these recent developments return to the work of the canonical authors, some contemporary scholars reject the traditional focus on epistemology (Baumgarten, Kant) and theorize sensation and the sensual encounter in terms of ontology instead (Harman, Shaviro). It is according to this shift that speculative realists have proclaimed aesthetics as ‘first philosophy’ and as speculative in nature. With speculative realism sensual encounter becomes an event that even no longer necessarily implies human agents. This is in alignment with the general speculative realist framework for thinking all kinds of entities and objects as free from our all-pervasive anthropocentrism which states, always, that everything is “for us.”

In this speculative realism has several important twentieth-century precursors, most notably Heidegger, Whitehead, Deleuze and Badiou with their respective concepts of event, (aesthetic) experience and encounter. This conference explores the resonances between these twentieth-century thinkers and their concepts and the recently reawakened interest in aesthetics, especially in its speculative realist guise. Hosted by the University of Basel’s Department of English the conference is particularly interested in the possible implications of what could be termed the new speculative aesthetics for literary and cultural studies. Thus, the conference aims at staging a three-fold encounter: between aesthetics and speculation, between speculative realism and its (possible) precursors, and between speculative realism and art and literature.

Please send&n;your 300-word abstracts and 150-word bios to:aesthetics-englsem@unibas.ch.

The deadline for submissions is December 5, 2011. A selection of the papers given at the conference will be published as a special issue of Speculations: Journal of Speculative Realism.

Conference Organizers:

Ridvan Askin, M.A.
Andreas Hägler, M.A.
Prof. Dr. Philipp Schweighauser
Department of English
University of Basel
Nadelberg 6
CH-4051 Basel
Switzerland
ridvan.askin[at]unibas.ch, andreas.haegler[at]unibas.ch, ph.schweighauser[at]unibas.ch&n; &n;

Paul Ennis
UCD School of Philosophy
University College Dublin
Newman Building
Belfield
Dublin 4
Ireland
ennis.paul[at]gmail.com

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August 24, 2011 Art and<br /><br /><br />
Education
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PACT Zollverein

IMPACT11
Me and My Glocal

An Interactive Symposium in 3 Episodes in 3 Days
With Phil Collins (GB/DE), m7red (AR), LA RIBOT (ES/VH)
27–30 October 2011IMPACT11 is aimed at artists, advanced students, academics and journalists working in the fields of dance, theatre, art, media art and film. The working language is English.Bullmannaue 20a
45327 Essen
Germany
www.pact-zollverein.de
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This is the seventh year in which the interdisciplinary symposium IMPACT has invited artists, practitioners, theoreticians and advanced students in the fields of dance, theatre, performance, visual arts, new media and film to engage critically with the artistic strategies and working methods of progressive guest artists, to test their approaches in practice and to question them with reference to their own background.In this 7th edition, IMPACT11 presents three artistic perspectives that generate humorous, playful and paradoxical possibilities of interacting and dealing with urban, social and political phenomenon using the artistic tools available to them. The artist La Ribot (ES/CH) develops lively and pernicious dialogues between object and body, image and action at the boundary between performance art and video art. The films of video artist Phil Collins (GB/DE) move along the interface between documentation and staging and play expertly with society’s desires: whether through dance-marathons in Ramallah or how fantasies are sold by a TV shopping channel. Via its virtual “chat-theatre,” the architecture collective m7red (AR) brings together experts and lay people from across the globe to discuss ecological and political questions, and develops games as part of preparing for floods and other urban catastrophe scenarios.During the symposium PACT Zollverein will present two lecture performances by m7red and Phil Collins on Thursday, 27th October, and the performance “llámame mariachi” by La Ribot on Saturday, 29th October.IMPACT11 offers a concentrated and motivational space for exchange, action and reflection that goes beyond one’s own usual boundaries. The daily schedule is decided by the artists themselves and will be influenced by the participants.The application form and further information about the guest artists and programme is available under:www.pact-zollverein.deApplication deadline:
15 September 2011
Fee: 100 EUR (Included in the fee are the 3-day symposium, 2 lectures, 1 performance and 7 meals)Contact
Isa Köhler
Tel : +49 (0) 201. 289 47 24
isa.koehler@pact-zollverein.de

—*

July 12, 2011 Art and</p><br /><br />
<p>Education
jul12_eciad.jpg
Emily Carr University of Art and Design

W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century

December 7–9, 2011Vancouver, CanadaRegistration is now open!
Early Bird Deadline: September 10, 2011 For more information and registration visit www.elialeadershipsymposium.com
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The European League of Institutes of the Arts and Emily Carr University are pleased to present the 5th ELIA Leadership Symposium: ‘W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century. The event will bring together leaders from higher arts education institutions and universities across the globe for an important and timely discussion on the changing role of art education today. Art and design education in the 21st Century has been transformed. For institutions what is at stake is a shift in the function of learning, where the skills developed are not based on the delivery of knowledge, but on the fostering of collaboration, networking, play and stimulation. Within this context, the event will address important strategic challenges faced by cultural institutions in the midst of transition, with a particular focus on leadership, succession and new pedagogical perspectives. Speakers include Douglas Coupland, Butch Morris, Claire Doherty and others.W/Here is committed to creating a generative environment of conversation, building towards outcomes that will have tangible effects for today’s higher arts education institutions and universities. Through a combination of formal presentations and round table discussions, W/Here will provide an opportunity to share strategies and models for addressing the role of the 21st Century art and design university.Three key themes will inform the content of the sessions:Have We Ever Been Modern: The Transformation of the Learning Space
Imagining the new arts school requires a challenge to the idea that Higher Arts Education knows itself and its own future. Demographic change, technology, ecology and an evolving urban space have undermined a model of an arts school once considered radical and modern nearly a century ago. What is required now are a series of informed provocations to stimulate a debate about the creation of a new type of art school building for a future in which the role of leadership in Higher Arts Education is being transformed. 
Dispersed Learning: Knowledge and Expertise in Arts and Design
Art schools are no longer the authoritarian keepers and distributors of knowledge. Their expertise is being challenged by social networks and increased mobility, both fostering informal and dispersed learning and exchange. Canons are crumbling. A new set of demands is placed on the art school to re-imagine and re-define its role. What expertise and knowledge should be developed to support the necessary shifts in leadership? These sessions will propose answers to new demands for leaders who see the role of their institution being contested. 
Open Source: Leading Through Access
New generations of leaders in education and the arts are emerging from the creative and technological changes that have surfaced in the past decade. How will this cadre of leaders be different from those who came before them? These sessions will focus on building deeper and more diverse leadership through access to the educational and developmental preparation of new leaders—those who come perhaps from different sociology-economic, educational or cultural backgrounds.
Emily Carr University
1399 Johnston Street
Vancouver, BC V6H 3R9 ELIA
Beulingstraat 8 
1017 BA Amsterdam 
The Netherlands Contact: info@elia-artschools.org ___*

iDC (@iDCtweets)
03/07/2011 12:00
Cybermohalla, School of Everything, Supercool School, Edu-Factory are examples of DIY universities http://bit.ly/mfuz6q #mobilityshifts

http://mobilityshifts.org/conference/

Conference

 MobilityShifts is grouped around three major themes:

Digital Fluencies for a Mobile World 

What are new pedagogic approaches for learning with mobile platforms? What are the limitations of the “digital literacies” paradigm and its first world/third world assumptions?

How do we promulgate digital fluency as an understanding of the particular features of global information flows in which data, attention, capital, and reputation might move both to and from individual actors and communities? 

How can mobile media platforms be used for more than the one-way delivery of  content? What are new pedagogical approaches for real-time mobile learning that  make full use of the potential of mobile phones, iPods, laptops, PDAs, smart  phones, Tablet  PCs, and netbooks in formal and informal contexts? How can global  participants use mobile media to create rich social contexts around important  learning tasks? How can such platforms be leveraged to teach digital rights and the  value of collaboration across cultures? 

How can we dispel the myth of the digital native? 

How can mobile networks reshape our experiences of space and place through interactive architecture, locative art, geo-caching games, and real-time object recognition? What opportunities for networked teaching and learning might we find in such media-rich, responsive environments? 

DIY U:Learning Without a School?

More and more people wish to get access to higher education and institutions for higher learning are not able to accommodate them. Where, what, and how people are learning changes dramatically. Mobility Shifts explores the changing locales for learning- from libraries, after school programs and museums to living rooms. it is about new learning institutions, informal peer-to-peer learning networks and the aspiration to get certification for new, self-directed types of study. The Austrian author Ivan Illich wrote that “Pupils do most of their learning without, and often despite, their teachers.” 

What can higher education learn from informal peer-networks and the Open Web? The French philosopher Jacques Rancière challenges educators to consider intellectual equality as a starting point for their teaching. What are the intellectual and emancipatory opportunities of informal peer-networks, self-education, and Do-It-Yourself Universities such as The Public School, Free Slow University of WarzawSchool of EverythingEdu-Factory, SuperCool SchoolUniversity of Openess, Universidad Experimental, Peer to Peer University, or Cybermoholla

What kind of insertions, rearrangements and revamping within existing institutional frameworks can we imagine? What are the dangers and opportunities of the Open Web in terms of for-profit education (e.g., Kaplan University)? 

Digital Learning Projects Globally 

The summit comes at an important juncture when digital learning is increasingly recognized as an important part of development worldwide. 

What is the future of learning with mobile platforms in countries including Brazil, Peru, India and China? 

What are inspiring digital learning initiatives worldwide and how they help us to solve our learning challenges? How can such approaches help us to overcome the inequitable distribution of broadband coverage and other infrastructural resources across the United States and other seemingly developed regions?

How can global digital learning projects help us to better understand and solve educational challenges in the United States?

How can we expand our definition of digital learning to include a diversity of practices that might include mobile money transfers, social networking among migrants, witness journalism and computer hacking?

Cybermohalla, for example, is an experiment, a constellation of dispersed nodes and networks of knowledge production about urban life in India.

___*

July 12, 2011 Art and</p><br /><br />
<p>Education
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Braunschweig University

Careful! Risk
Art and Science / Art and the production of knowledge – Perspectives for Art Academies

Symposium
9–11 November 2011www.hbk-bs.de
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Wanting to know what something is, means wanting to examine it. Out of pure curiosity or with practical intentions, research is risky. I reach for something that is still unknown and don’t know what will happen. Research extends the store of knowledge and at the same time questions it by renewing knowledge from the ground up. Careful, research! Research can topple everything I thought I knew. Knowledge is transient, like everything else. With recent developments in contemporary art and cultural theory and also current trends in the development of German and European art academies, the question of the relationship between art and science is of vital importance. One part of the conference will deal with forms, possibilities, and the limits of dissolution of the boundaries between art and science, with a collaboration of artists (Ulrike Grossarth, Tacita Dean, Michael Stevenson), designers (Ruedi Bauer, Annette Stahmer, André Heers) and scientists from the fields of art and cultural science and philosophy (Mario Perniola, Kathrin Busch, Frauke Tomczak). The term “artistic research” can act as the main point of departure and designate the artistic production process, not only in the fine arts but also in the areas of design, theatre, film, literature, music and dance.A further section will gather teaching artists, designers and scientists from various European art academies to discuss the developments of their institutions with regard to study courses in art, design, and theory. With a view to the still imminent changes in study structures at the HBK as a result of the Bologna Reform, it is fundamentally important to raise the issue of the dissolving of borders between the arts, design, and sciences. What possibilities and also what risks does the shaping of this constellation present for an art academy today?As an art academy, the Braunschweig University of Art will be turning 50 in 2013. The conference Careful! Risk has the task of stimulating a debate at the HBK about the objectives it will be setting for itself in the future.The conference is organized by Prof. Dr. Hannes Böhringer, Dr. Susanne Märtens and the Braunschweig University of Art.We cordially invite you to register at the following e-mail address: vorsicht­-wagnis@hbk-bs.deHochschule für Bildende Künste Braunschweig
Leitung Referat Presse und Kommunikation
Johannes-Selenka-Platz 1
38118 Braunschweig
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